Derricke's The Image of Irelande (1581) - Print 9


For if his ualure once be mou'de reuenge on them to take,
Which doe our ſoueraigne Princes lawes, like beaſtly beaſtes forſake;
Tys not the cruell ſtormy rage, nor gathered force of thoſe,
Nor yet the crooked crabbtree lookes, of greaſye glibbedThese wood-karne went with glibbed heads, or wearing long bushy hair hanging ouer their eyes, disguising them, and seruing as a fit mask for a uillain. foes
Can make him to reuoke the thing, his honor hath pretended,
But that Dame Juſtice muſt proceede, 'gaynst thoſe that haue offended.
For Mars will ſee the finall end of trayt'rous waged warres,
To plucke the hartes of Rebells downe, that lately pearſt the ſtarres.
To yelde them guerdon for deſertes, by rigour of his blade,
And with the ſame to gall their hartes, which ſuch uprores haue made.
Loe where it is in open ſight, most perfect to be ſeene,
Which ſheweth the fatall end aright of rebells to our Queene.

For if his valour once be moved revenge on them to take,
Which do our sovereign Prince's laws, like beastly beasts forsake:
Tis not the cruel stormy rage, nor gathered force of those,
Nor yet the crooked crabbtree looks, of greasy glibbedThese wood-karne went with glibbed heads, or wearing long bushy hair hanging over their eyes, disguising them, and serving as a fit mask for a villain. foes
Can make him to revoke the thing, his honour has pretended,
But that Dame Justice must proceed, against those that have offended.

For Mars will see the final end of traitorous waged wars,
To pluck the hearts of Rebels down, that lately pierced the stars.
To yield them guerdonA reward or recompense for deserts, by rigour of his blade,
And with the same to gall their hearts, which such uproars have made.
Lo, where it is in open sight, most perfect to be seen,
Which shows the fatal end aright of rebels to our Queen.


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