Derricke's The Image of Irelande (1581) - Print 7


B  


A  


Which for to proue in euery poynt, (to his eternall fame)
   He ſtandeth forth in open field, for tryall of the ſame,
   Round compaſt with a worthy crewe, moſt comely to be ſeene,
   Of Captaines bolde, for to byhold the honor of that Queene.
   And they be garded with the like, of ualiaunt Souldiars then:
   Whereof the meaneſt haue been founde, full often doughty men.
C  





All which are in readynes, to uenture lyfe and bloud:
For ſafegard of her happy ſtate, whereon our ſafeties ſtoode,
But ere they enter mongeſt thoſe broyles, Syr Henry doth prefarre:
(If happ to get) a bleſſed peace, before moſt cruell warre,
Which if they will not take in worth, (the folly is their owne)
For then he goeth with fire and ſworde, to make her power knowne.
B  


A  


Which for to prove in every point, (to his eternal fame)
   He stands forth in open field, for trial of the same,
   Round compassed with a worthy crew, most comely to be seen,
   Of Captains bold, for to behold the honour of that Queen.
   And they be guarded with the like, of valiant Soldiers then:
   Whereof the meanest have been found, full often doughty men.
C  





All which are in readiness, to venture life and blood:
For safeguard of her happy state, whereon our safeties stood,
But ere you enter amongst those broils, Sir Henry does prefer:
(If happens to get) a blessed peace, before most cruel war,
Which if they will not take in worth, (the folly is their own)
For then he goes with fire and sword, to make her power known.
The man in the centre receiving a letter from Sir Philip Sydney is labelled "Donolle Obreane the messenger", and is saying "shogh".


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