Derricke's The Image of Irelande (1581) - Print 5


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A  

And though the pray recouer'd be, yet are not all thinges ended:
For why: the ſouldiours doe pursue, the Rogues that haue offended.
Who neuer ceaſe till in the bloud, of theſe light fing'red theeues:
Their blades are bathd to teach them how, they after prowle for Beeues.
To ſee a ſouldiour toze a Karne, O Lord it is a wonder:
And eke what care he takth to part, the head from neck a ſonder.


C  
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To ſee another leade a theefe, with ſuch a lordly grace:
And for to marke how lothe the knaue, doth follow in that caſe.
To see how trimme their glibbedThese wood-karne went with glibbed heads, or wearing long bushy hair hanging ouer their eyes, disguising them, and seruing as a fit mask for a uillain. heades, are borne by ualiant men,
And garded with a royall forte, of worthy ſouldiours then.
All theſe are thinges ſufficient, to moue a ſubiects minde:
To prayſe the ſouldiours, which reward, the woodkarne in their kinde.
B  



A  

And though the prey recovered be, yet are not all things ended:
For why: the soldiers do pursue, the Rogues that have offended.
Who never cease till in the blood, of these light fingered thieves:
Their blades are bathed to teach them how, they after prowl for Beeves.
To see a soldier tozeTo pull violently a Kern, O Lord it is a wonder:
And eke? what care he takes to part, the head from neck a sunder.


C  
D  


To see another lead a thief, with such a lordly grace:
And for to mark how loathe the knave, does follow in that case.
To see how trim their glibbedThese wood-karne went with glibbed heads, or wearing long bushy hair hanging over their eyes, disguising them, and serving as a fit mask for a villain. heads, are borne by valiant men,
And guarded with a royal fort, of worthy soldiers then.
All these are things sufficient, to move a subject's mind:
To praise the soldiers, which reward, the wood-kern in their kind.


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