Derricke's The Image of Irelande (1581) - Print 4





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And when with myrth and belly cheere, they are ſufficed well,
Marke what enſueth, a playne diſcourse, of Irish ſleightes I tell:
The fryer then abſolues the theefe, from all his former ſinne,
And bids him plague the princes frendes, if heauen he minde to winne.
Which beyng ſayd, he takes his horſe, to put in practiſe then,
The ſpoyling and deſtroying of her graces loyall men.
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But Loe the ſouldiers then the plague, unto this Karniſh rowt:
To yeld them uengeaunce for their ſinnes, in warlick ſort riſe out.
They preſſe the rancoure of the theeues, by force of bloudy knife,
And ſtay the pray they filcht away, depriuing them of life:
The fryer then that traytrous knaue, with Ough Ough hone lament:
To ſee his cooſin Deuills ſonnes, to haue ſo fowle euent.


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And when with mirth and belly cheer, they are sufficed well,
Mark what ensues, a plain discourse, of Irish sleights I tell:
The friar then absolves the thief, from all his former sin,
And bids him plague the prince's friends, if heaven he mind to win.
Which being said, he takes his horse, to put in practice then,
The spoiling and destroying of her grace's loyal men.

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But Lo the soldiers then the plague, unto this Kernish rout:
To yield them vengeance for their sins, in warlike sort rise out.
They press the rancour of the thieves, by force of bloody knife,
And stay the prey they filched away, depriving them of life:
The friar then that traitorous knave, with Ough Ough hone lament:
To see his cousin Devil's sons, to have so foul event.


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